SDR# UDP Audio Stream plugin

SDR# UDP Audio Stream PluginThis was something I was looking for, for a long time. The plugin makes it possible to stream the demodulated SDR# audio via UDP to another program that is listening on that specific TCP/IP address and UDP port. The same function was already available within GQRX. This for example makes it possible to receive and demodulate satellite telemetry and send it to GNURadio where the final telemetry decoding will be done.

The plugin consists of two files and the magic line for the SDR# plugin.xml file.

NAudio.dll and SDRSharp.UDPAudio.dll

Magic line: <add key=”UDPAudioPlugin” value=”SDRSharp.UDPAudio.UDPAudioPlugin,SDRSharp.UDPAudio” />

Source: UDP Audio Stream plugin

SigintOS

SigintOS

Also for HAM Radio enthusiasts SigintOS can be a way to get acquainted with the Linux operating systems and SDR radios.

SigintOS; as the name suggests, SIGINT is an improved Linux distribution for Signal Intelligence. This distribution is based on Ubuntu Linux. It has its own software called SigintOS. With this software, many SIGINT operations can be performed via a single graphical interface.

Hardware and software installation problems faced by many people interested in signal processing are completely eliminated with SigintOS. HackRF, BladeRF, USRP, RTL-SDR are already installed, and the most used Gnuradio, Gsm and Gps applications are also included in the distribution.

SigintOS works live from a DVD or USB memory stick. Users can also perform the installation process on the hard disk. For installation, simply download sigintos.iso from this download link and write it to a USB flash drive or DVD. It can also run smoothly on virtualization applications such as VMware or VirtualBox.

Source: SigintOS

Posted in SDR

UWE-4 News

Last week our Team returned from the Vostochny Launch Site (Russia) where we performed the last check out tests of UWE-4 before launch. The satellite will be launched through the German integrator ECM Space on a Soyuz-2 mission using a Fregat upper stage on 27th December 2018 at 02:07:18 UTC. UWE-4 transportation to Far East of Russia was very smooth, so only a last software update and recharging of the batteries needed to be performed. By now, UWE-4 has been successfully integrated into the launch deployer followed by the integration with the upper stage, the fairing encapsulation will occur today.

In the meantime we updated our website to provide more detailed information about the orbit and the communication parameter including the beacon decoding information. You can find all these and some more details here: http://www7.informatik.uni-wuerzburg.de/forschung/space-exploration/projects/uwe-4/ As soon as we can provide the TLE, you will find them also on our website.

Kind regards, The UWE‑4 Team

Posted in UWE

An open letter

This isn’t the first time this topic is brought to our attention but after reading this call I felt obliged to share one of the important parts and a link to the original posting.

Original quote:

“According to the ITU Radio Regulations for the Amateur and Amateur-satellite Services, “Transmissions between amateur stations of different countries shall not be encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning, except for control signals exchanged between earth command stations and space stations in the amateur-satellite service.” A strict interpretation of this rule means that the specifications of all digital protocols used by Amateur stations should be publicly available, so that anyone is able decode the data. The use of protocols with undisclosed specifications can be seen as a try to obscure the meaning of the data.”

Source: By Dr. Daniel Estévez, an open letter about ESEO telemetry specifications.

Meet the Amateur Astronomer Who Found a Lost NASA Satellite

Amateur astronomer Scott Tilley made international headlines when he rediscovered NASA’s IMAGE satellite 13 years after it mysteriously disappeared. In this interview with Freethink, Scott discusses his role in the satellite’s recovery, why he enjoys amateur astronomy, and how citizen scientists like him have contributed to our knowledge of space from the space race to the present day.

Source: Scott Tilley and Freethink Media